Controlling Mosquitoes and Dangerous Disease Risk

Controlling Mosquitoes and Dangerous Disease Risk

Article Featured on Valley Vet

Enjoying time on the patio; hiking with your furry friend; riding your horse; finishing up barn chores. What do all of these have in common? None of them are nearly as pleasant when you’re being swarmed with mosquitoes.

More than an annoyance, mosquitoes carry deadly diseases impacting people, pets, horses and livestock. Some of the risks include:

  • People are at risk for several mosquito-transmitted diseases, including West Nile Virus, Malaria and Zika Virus, which causes serious birth defects such as microcephaly. Babies with microcephaly have smaller heads and often have smaller brains that might not have properly developed.
  • Pets are at significant risk for heartworm disease, a deadly disease transmitted by mosquitoes. Protect pets with heartworm medications, providing nearly 100 percent effectiveness against the disease.
  • Horses are threatened with mortality rates up to 90 percent from mosquito-transmitted diseases, which include West Nile virus, Eastern equine encephalomyelitis and Western equine encephalomyelitis. Vaccinations against disease can protect horses from grave risk.
  • Livestock can be plagued with extensive blood loss, reduced productivity and even death when faced with large populations of mosquitoes.

One acre of land can house 1 million mosquito eggs. Help eliminate the mosquito population by removing mosquito-breeding habitats, such as anything that can hold water, like unused troughs, tarps and wheelbarrows.

If your yard or barn area has any low-lying areas that collect water after rainfall, be sure to fill these in. If you have horses and livestock, hang fans throughout your barns, as mosquitoes typically avoid moving air.

Additionally, deploy proven mosquito prevention products, such as the Mosquito Eradicator, to help defeat the enemy. The Mosquito Eradicator has the same attractant triggers that draw mosquitoes to people and animals, creating a barrier to catch hunting mosquitoes and controlling 95 percent of mosquitoes for 90 days.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Dr. Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine) welcomes referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.

Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com