Elective Surgery: Should You Or Shouldn’t You?

Elective Surgery: Should You Or Shouldn’t You?

Article by T. J. Dunn, Jr., DVM | Found on PetMD

Just before noon one Saturday we were seeing the last of the morning’s appointments. No surgeries were scheduled on Saturdays because we all hoped to get outdoors and enjoy the weekend. Then the phone rang and everything changed. Continue reading Elective Surgery: Should You Or Shouldn’t You?

Mapping the Feline Brain: How Smart Is Your Cat?

Mapping the Feline Brain: How Smart Is Your Cat?

By Dr. Lorie Huston, DVM | Found on PetMD

Have you ever wondered, when your cat looks at you or seems to be trying to communicate with you, exactly how smart your cat is? Have you seen your cat perform some behavior or task that seems like it should be beyond his capabilities?

Most people believe the brain is the center of intelligence. In terms of size, the brain of the cat accounts for approximately 0.9 percent of its body mass, compared to about 2 percent in an average human and about 1.2 percent in an average dog. Though the brain of a cat is comparatively smaller than that of other species, relative brain size isn’t always the best indicator of intelligence. And the cat brain shares some amazing similarities with our own brains. Continue reading Mapping the Feline Brain: How Smart Is Your Cat?

How to Exercise and Play with a Cat

How to Exercise and Play with a Cat

Featured on PetMD

Do you worry that your indoor cat is not getting enough exercise? While it is true that cats have the evolutionary advantage of a high metabolism that works even as they lounge around (see lions in the wild), they do still need some physical activity to keep them from a sedentary life of sloth and eventual obesity.

Unlike dogs, cats cannot be hitched to the end of a leash and taken for a stroll around the neighborhood — well, some can, but they need to be trained from kitten-hood. It may take a little imagination, along with some trial and error, but you can find ways to encourage your cat to be more active. Playing with your cat can be a great form of encouragement. All it takes is a few creative ideas to keep your cat entertained and active! Continue reading How to Exercise and Play with a Cat

Anesthesia and Surgery: Four Senior Dog Success Stories

Anesthesia and Surgery: Four Senior Dog Success Stories

Article written by Dr. Phil Zeltzmann, DVM, DACVS, CVJ | Found on PetHealthNetwork

Kelly Serfas, a Certified Veterinary Technician in Bethlehem, PA, contributed to this article.

Two of the most frequent comments veterinarians hear about senior dogs who need surgery are:

  • “That’s a lot of money for a 12-year-old”
  • “I’m concerned about the risks of anesthesia

As I always say, “age is not a disease.” What matters is the overall health of the patient, not the age. There are 14-year-old dogs who are healthier than 8-year-olds. When properly done, the risk of anesthesia is not significantly greater in seniors.

Keep in mind, when a senior dog requires anesthesia, it’s not for the fun of it. It is for a good medical reason, such as cleaning dirty teeth, or fixing a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), or removing a tumor. In any of these situations, the reason we recommend anesthesia and surgery is to improve the dog’s quality of life. So, instead of focusing on the dog’s age, which is just a number, we should focus on the health of the patient and the risks involved. In addition, we need to discuss how to decrease or manage the risks. Continue reading Anesthesia and Surgery: Four Senior Dog Success Stories

Parvo In Dogs

Parvo In Dogs

Article by Jeff Butler | Found on Canine Journal

Canine parvovirus type 2 or “parvo” is a highly contagious virus that is particularly prominent in the canine community. Parvo is of particular concern for puppy owners due to the severity of symptoms and the weak immune systems of younger dogs. There are ways to help prevent parvo, and it from spreading, and as a responsible dog owner it is important to be familiar with these prevention methods. Effective prevention begins with understanding the virology and pathophysiology of the virus itself. Continue reading Parvo In Dogs

6 Pet Health Myths You Need to Stop Believing

Found on PetMD | Written by Diana Bocco

Warm noses, eating grass, and dangerous foods—none of them mean exactly what you think they mean. Misconceptions about your pet’s health abound and some of them can actually harm your furry one if you aren’t able to differentiate truth from myth.

Here are six common myths about dog health that you may have fallen for in the past. Continue reading 6 Pet Health Myths You Need to Stop Believing

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

Found on PetMD

Dogs love to munch away on grass, and some even make it part of their daily routine. Fortunately, most experts believe it isn’t something you should worry about. So why exactly do they gobble up that green stuff in your yard? Continue reading Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

Top 10 Signs of Cancer in Dogs

Top 10 Signs of Cancer in Dogs

Article by Christine McLaughlin | DogTime

It’s a dog owner’s worst nightmare hearing the four words: “Your dog has cancer.” But it’s a stark reality for many. In fact, one in three dogs will develop cancer, according to the National Canine Cancer Foundation. Cancer occurs in both mixed breed and purebred dogs (depending on the cancer, some breeds like Great Danes, Saint Bernards, Boxers, Boston Terriers, and Golden Retrievers are considered at high risk). Canine cancer can happen at any age but most often it occurs in older dogs, which is partially because dogs are living longer due to modern, enhanced nutrition and veterinary care.

What Is Cancer?

But first it’s important to define cancer. Cancer is a disease where cells grow out of control, invade surrounding tissue, and can spread (metastasize). Just like in humans, cancer can take many forms in dogs. The disease can be localized (in one area) or generalized (spread throughout the body). Cancer is considered multifactorial, which means it has no known single cause but heredity and the environment are thought to be factors. Continue reading Top 10 Signs of Cancer in Dogs

Kidney Disease in Dogs: What Dog Owners Should Know

Kidney Disease in Dogs: What Dog Owners Should Know

Article by Jason Carr | Found on PetHealthNetwork

Kidney disease is very common in dogs, and protecting your pooch from kidney disease means you should be prepared to look for problems early. Studies show that 1 in 10 dogs suffer from kidney disease, reports Dr. Celeste Clements. Dogs can get kidney disease for any number of underlying reasons, and even worse, it’s often difficult to spot. Some of the earliest signs of kidney disease in dogs may include subtle weight loss, urinating/peeing more often and drinking a lot more water. Therefore, if you notice your dog is peeing on the floor or asking to go out more, or if your dog is always thirsty, it’s time to visit your veterinarian.

However, once these signs are present, there’s typically already been a great deal of kidney damage. Fortunately, new advances in the veterinary world are making it easier to find kidney disease in dogs earlier (even without signs being present). Continue reading Kidney Disease in Dogs: What Dog Owners Should Know

Thyroid Tumor Surgery in Cats

Thyroid Tumor Surgery in Cats

Article by Dr. Phil Zeltzman | Featured on PetHealthNetwork

Did you know that cats can have a hyperactive thyroid gland? Also known as hyperthyroidism, it’s a fairly common condition in older cats. In fact, the vast majority of affected cats are older than 10 years of age. Most of the time, the reason is either a benign tumor or benign enlargement of the thyroid gland(s). Continue reading Thyroid Tumor Surgery in Cats