5 Hot Tips for Summer Pet Care

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5 Hot Tips for Summer Pet Care

Article Found on MyPet.com

Summertime is fun time, but hot weather makes for some unique summer pet care challenges. Although wild animals are well adapted to the elements, companion animals can be just as susceptible to extreme temperatures as their owners are. What does that mean for your pet? When the temperatures get extreme, pet safety should be top of mind. Here are 5 ways to stay safe while enjoying summer activities with your pet: Continue reading 5 Hot Tips for Summer Pet Care

Best Senior Dog Food: Key Ingredients to Look For

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Best Senior Dog Food: Key Ingredients to Look For

Article Found on GreyMuzzle.org

As your dog gets older, you want to make sure that you are making choices that will make their life as enjoyable as possible, including choosing the right food. There are more dog food options available than ever before, including many that are for “senior” dogs. What makes a dog a senior citizen? It can vary based on breed or size, with larger dogs being considered senior at 6-9 years, and small dogs not reaching that milestone until their early teens.

If your dog is in one of these categories, you may be considering making the switch to a senior formula dog food. Here is what you need to know in order to compare labels and choose the best senior dog food for your pet. Continue reading Best Senior Dog Food: Key Ingredients to Look For

Why Losing a Dog Can Be Harder Than Losing a Relative

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Why Losing a Dog Can Be Harder Than Losing a Relative

Article by Natasha Feduik | Found on PetMD

I was 20 years old when I got my first dog. Of course, there were family dogs growing up, but this was my dog. I was living on my own for the first time, and he was mine to care for, love, and teach. It was like having a child. He relied on me for his basic life needs, like feeding, walking, and love. I relied on him for emotional support, entertainment, and love.

Though unlike a child who would grow up, move out, and start a life of his own, my dog was always going to be by my side, needing me as much as I needed him. We did everything together—we were inseparable. Continue reading Why Losing a Dog Can Be Harder Than Losing a Relative

How to Give Your Pet a Pill

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How to Give Your Pet a Pill

Article Found on PetMD | Written by Mindy Cohen

Giving oral medication to a cat or dog can be a challenge for pet parents. If your veterinarian recommends medication for your cat or dog, she has your pet’s best interest in mind. Fortunately, pilling a pet is not an impossible task once you learn a few tricks of the trade. Here’s how to increase your success. Continue reading How to Give Your Pet a Pill

Pet Exposure May Reduce Allergies and Obesity in Children

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Pet Exposure May Reduce Allergies and Obesity in Children

Article Found on Science Daily

If you need a reason to become a dog lover, how about their ability to help protect kids from allergies and obesity?

A new University of Alberta study showed that babies from families with pets — 70 per cent of which were dogs — showed higher levels of two types of microbes associated with lower risks of allergic disease and obesity.

But don’t rush out to adopt a furry friend just yet. Continue reading Pet Exposure May Reduce Allergies and Obesity in Children

7 Causes of Cat Sneezing

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7 Causes of Cat Sneezing

Article by Dr. Mike Paul, DVM | Found on PetHealthNetwork

Ever see a little kitten wrinkle its nose and let out with a cute sneeze?  It sounds sort of like “Pfft!” and may or may not be accompanied by a few droplets.

We all sneeze on occasion for what is seemingly no reason. As you might imagine, If your cat sneezes once in a while, and is otherwise active and normal, it is probably nothing to worry about. However, if your cat’s sneezes are more than occasional or are accompanied by blood or mucus, or if your cat has a concurrent discharge from his eyes or also has a cough, the sneeze may be a sign of more significant problems. Continue reading 7 Causes of Cat Sneezing

Keep Your Dog Safe in the Summer

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Keep Your Dog Safe in the Summer

Article By Andrew Kaleita | Found on Cesar’s Way

Summer is a terrific time to be a dog owner. It lets you run, swim, and play with your dog in nicer weather than any other time of the year. However, summer also brings unique risks to your dog’s health that you should keep in mind throughout the season. These summer dangers include: Continue reading Keep Your Dog Safe in the Summer

How do You Know if Your Cat is in Pain?

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How do You Know if Your Cat is in Pain?

Article by Dr. Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS, CVJ | Found on PetHealthNetwork

Assessing pain is a complicated challenge, especially in cats. Pain has two primary components: the sensory aspect (intensity, location and duration) and the affective aspect (emotional toll).

Because pain assessment is somewhat subjective, veterinarians constantly try to create tools that make this process more objective. For validity, any pain measuring tool should take into consideration both characteristics: the sensory and the affective.

Signs of pain in cats

A British study was recently conducted in order to reach a consensus about criteria when evaluating pain in cats. A total of 91 signs, chosen from the existing literature, were assessed during four rounds of evaluation, by 19 feline medicine experts. Some worked in private practice, others in veterinary schools1.

Ultimately, 25 signs were considered to be reliable and sensitive for indicating pain in cats, across a range of different clinical conditions1:

Top 5 signs

  • Appetite decrease
  • Avoiding bright areas
  • Growling
  • Groaning
  • Eyes closed

Other signs included: Lameness, difficulty to jump, abnormal gait, reluctant to move, reaction to touch, withdrawing/hiding, absence of grooming, playing less, overall activity decrease, less rubbing toward people, general mood, temperament, hunched up posture, shifting of weight, licking a particular body region, lower head posture, eyelids tightly shut, change in form of feeding behavior, straining to urinate, tail flitching

The top 5 signs are indicative of severe pain. Behavioral changes, such as irritability, tend to be seen with more long-term pain. The other signs can be observed with less intense pain. All of these signs cover both the sensorial and the emotional aspects of pain1.

What if you see these signs of pain in your cat?

Cat owners should be aware of these signs. Some mistakenly attribute behavioral changes, such as absence of grooming or playing less, as signs of aging; they can actually be signs of pain.

Remember, the presence of any single one of these 5 signs means pain. If you see any of these signs in your cat, see your veterinarian right away. Also remember that the absence of a sign does not mean your cat is no pain.

These signs may help both vets and cat guardians better assess the pain status of cats in their care.

While it can be fairly easy to recognize severe pain, it is much more difficult to detect low grade pain. The criteria above are a great start. Hopefully, this research will spark more studies to help us assess mild pain in cats as well to ensure their well-being.

If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian — they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.


Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital (OVSH) has been serving the Portland and Beaverton area community since 1979. Drs. Steven F. Skinner (Neurology, Neurosurgery) and Robert T. Franklin (Internal medicine.) We welcome referrals from veterinarians all over the Pacific Northwest. Our goal is to help your pet regain health and live a long and happy life.

Oregon Veterinary Specialty Hospital

Address
9339 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy,
Beaverton, OR 97005.

Phone: 503.292.3001
Fax: 503.292.6808
Email: info@ovshosp.com

6 Common Illnesses to Watch for in Puppies

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6 Common Illnesses to Watch for in Puppies

Article by Amanda Baltazar| Found on Pet MD

Your puppy is brand new and you want to protect him. The best thing you can do is to feed him a healthy, balanced diet, says Dr. Jim Dobies, a veterinarian with South Point Pet Hospital in Charlotte, N.C., and a member of the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Association

“If you do, you’re giving your puppy’s immune system the best chance to fight off infection, he says. “He is in better shape to fight off illness and recover.”

But you can’t protect your baby pooch from everything. Here are six common illnesses he could catch in his first year of life. Continue reading 6 Common Illnesses to Watch for in Puppies

Finding Ticks on Your Dog: 5 Places to Look

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Finding Ticks on Your Dog: 5 Places to Look

Aricle By Lynne Miller | Found on Pet MD

You quickly run your hands along your dog’s head, back, and belly, and, finding no ticks, you think your job is done.

Actually, finding ticks on your dog is not so simple. These tiny bloodsuckers are good at playing hide-and-seek, particularly when their host is covered in thick, dark hair. Ticks can latch on to your furry friend and live in hiding, feasting on blood for several days at a time. Even dogs with flea and tick collars and other forms of protection can be targeted by these parasites. Continue reading Finding Ticks on Your Dog: 5 Places to Look